Howard Goodall – Britain’s Treasured Music Communicator

Howard Goodall

Howard Goodall deserves a place within the pantheon of the world’s greatest documentary series presenters, among them Jacob Bronowski, Carl Sagan, David Attenborough, and Neil deGrasse Tyson. I first encountered Howard Goodall in 2017 when PBS Wisconsin aired his “Sgt. Pepper’s Musical Revolution” and I was wowed by his enthusiasm, knowledge of music, and presentation style. Since then, I’ve purchased several of his music documentary series (some of them are not currently available, at least not here in the U.S.), and there is no question he is not only a British treasure, but a world treasure.

If you want to obtain a deeper knowledge of the music theory behind classical and popular music, seek him out! You won’t be disappointed.


Sgt. Pepper’s Musical Revolution (2017)
DVD (includes Lennon/McCartney from Howard Goodall’s 20th Century Greats)


Howard Goodall’s The Story of Music (2013)

  1. The Popular Age
  2. The Age of Rebellion
  3. The Age of Tragedy
  4. The Age of Elegance & Sensibility
  5. The Age of Invention
  6. The Age of Discovery
    MP4 download – make your own DVD with Wondershare DVD Creator

Music Room with Howard Goodall (2010)

  1. Julian Lloyd Webber (cellist)
  2. Lang Lang (pianist)
  3. Nicola Beneditti (violinist)
  4. Alison Balsom (trumpeter)
  5. Leif Ove Andsnes (pianist)
  6. Emma Johnson (clarinetist)
  7. Natalie Clein (cellist)
  8. Evelyn Glennie (percussionist)
    Not currently available?

How Music Works (2006)

  1. Melody
  2. Rhythm
  3. Harmony
  4. Bass
    MP4 download – make your own DVD with Wondershare DVD Creator

Howard Goodall’s 20th Century Greats (2004)

  1. Lennon/McCartney
  2. Bernard Herrmann
  3. Leonard Bernstein
  4. Cole Porter
    DVD

Howard Goodall’s Great Dates (2002)

  1. 1564
  2. 1791
  3. 1874
  4. 1937
    Not currently available?

Howard Goodall’s Big Bangs (2000)

  1. The Thin Red Line: Guido of Arezzo & the Invention of Notation
  2. The Inventing of Opera
  3. Accidentals will happen: The Invention of Equal Temperament
  4. Bartolomeo Cristofori and his Amazing Loud and Soft Machine
  5. Mary and her Little Lamb: The Invention of Recorded Sound
    DVD

Howard Goodall’s Choir Works (1998)

  1. Bulgaria & Estonia
  2. Nashville
  3. South Africa
  4. Oxford
    DVD

Howard Goodall’s Organ Works (1997)

  1. Medieval Organs
  2. Baroque Organs
  3. 19th Century
  4. Contemporary
    DVD

Emergence

Physics is the fundamental science in that it describes the workings of the universe at all scales.  No other science is so comprehensive.

Will our knowledge of physics finally lead us to a “Theory of Everything”?  Perhaps, but the Theory of Everything alone will not be able to describe, predict, or explain its full expression upon/within the universe—no more so than our musical notation system can explain how a Brahms symphony was composed, nor its effect upon the listener.

Reductionism states that the whole is the sum of its parts, but emergence states that the whole is more than the sum of its parts.

There are many examples of emergent properties in the natural world, what one might call radical novelty.  Some examples:  crystal structure (e.g. a salt crystal or a snowflake), ripples in a sand dune, clouds, life itself.  Social organization (e.g. a school of fish or a city), consciousness.

John Archibald Wheeler (1911-2008) created a diagram that nicely illustrates an emergent property of the universe that is important to us.

The universe viewed as a self-excited circuit. Starting simply (thin U at right), the universe grows in complexity with time (thick U at left), eventually giving rise to observer-participancy, which in turn imparts “tangible reality” to even the earliest days of the universe.

Richard Wolfson writes,

At some level of complexity, emergent properties become so interesting that, although we understand that they come from particles that are held together by the laws of physics, we can’t understand or appreciate them through physics alone.

I like to think of emergence as an expression of creativity. Our universe is inherently creative, just as we humans express ourselves creatively through music, art, literature, architecture, and in so many other ways.

Creativity is the most natural process in the universe. It’s in our DNA.

But DNA alone can’t explain it.

References

Richard Wolfson, The Great Courses, Course No. 1280, “Physics and Our Universe: How It All Works”, Lecture 1: “The Fundamental Science”, 2011.


“And the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.” – T. S. Eliot

Tucson Classical Music Performances 2023

Here’s a comprehensive list of live classical music performances in Tucson for the year 2023 where the program of composers and works has been published. I will keep this Excel document regularly updated. Please post a comment if anything should be added or changed.

I’ve included a column called “Dave’s Faves” which notes the works I am already familiar with and that I highly recommend. This is subjective, of course, but I hope this will help some of you in deciding which concerts to attend.

Happy Listening!

Tucson Classical Music Performances 2023

Click here for 2022 concerts.

Sources
Tucson Symphony Orchestra
Arizona Friends of Chamber Music
University of Arizona Fred Fox School of Music
Southern Arizona Symphony Orchestra
Civic Orchestra of Tucson
Tucson Repertory Orchestra
True Concord, Voices & Orchestra
Arizona Opera

Ending Spring Forward, Fall Back

On March 15, the U.S. Senate voted unanimously to end the twice annual switch between Standard Time and Daylight Saving Time. So far so good. That leaves us now with two choices: standard time year round or daylight saving time year round. Unfortunately, they have chosen the latter. The fact that there was no debate on this point suggests the esteemed senators collectively have little understanding of science—or, at least, biology and astronomy.

Most astronomers (those that actually observe) and astronomy educators don’t like daylight saving time because it delays the onset of darkness by an hour: most of us observe in the evening and not right before dawn. Cruelly, daylight saving time prevents many young people from experiencing the wonders of the night sky because it gets dark around or after their bedtime during the warmer months of the year.

Non-astronomers (which, let’s face it, includes most of us) that rise early in the morning will spend even more of their year getting up while it is still dark out. In the northern U.S. at least that means that during the winter months, many school children will be going to school in the dark when it is still bitterly cold.

I have written previously on this topic.

As for biology, unless all of us also start our work days and school days an hour later, year-round daylight saving time will further mess with our already-damaged circadian rhythms—and most of us don’t get enough sleep as it is. As many studies have shown, this leads to a number of negative consequences affecting our health and well being.

The answer is, of course, to adopt standard time year-round as Arizona currently does. Even that is now in jeopardy as Arizona is likely to join the bandwagon and go to permanent daylight saving time, if this legislation is enacted.

This legislation now goes to the U.S. House of Representatives and, if it passes there, on to President Biden’s desk to sign into law. If that happens, most/all? of the U.S. will be going to permanent daylight saving time beginning officially November 5, 2023 (actually, March 12, 2023).

Is anyone pushing for year-round standard time instead? You bet.

I encourage you to support this organization, Save Standard Time, a registered 501(c)(4) nonprofit organization.

Sibelius Violin Concerto

The Finnish composer Jean Sibelius (1865-1957) aspired to be a virtuoso violinist, but abandoned that career because he felt that he had begun his “training for the exacting career of a virtuoso too late.” But it must have been some consolation that his violin concerto of 1904/1905—his only concerto—is one of the most inspired works of that genre in the repertoire.

There are many fine recordings of the Sibelius Violin Concerto, but one I am especially fond of is a 1951 recording with Isaac Stern and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Sir Thomas Beecham.

Here’s the conclusion of the work, nicely illustrating the passion and energy of this performance by Stern and Beecham’s Royal Philharmonic despite the primitive recording technology available at the time. Just goes to show that there were some remarkable recordings made more than 70 years ago!

Conclusion of the 1951 recording of Isaac Stern playing the Sibelius Violin Concerto with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Sir Thomas Beecham, conducting

While we’re on the topic of violin concertos, here are the best I’ve heard, in chronological order of their composition. Seek them out and enjoy!

Concerto for 2 Violins in D minor, BWV 1043 – Johann Sebastian Bach (c. 1730)

Violin Concerto in D major, op. 61 – Ludwig van Beethoven (1806)

Violin Concerto in E minor, op. 64 – Felix Mendelssohn (1844)

Violin Concerto No. 8 in D major, op. 99 – Charles-Auguste de Bériot (c. 1845)

Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor, op. 26 – Max Bruch (1867)

Violin Concerto in D major, op. 77 – Johannes Brahms (1878)

Violin Concerto in D major, op. 35 – Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1878)

Violin Concerto in A minor, op. 53 – Antonín Dvořák (1879)

Violin Concerto in D minor, op. 47 – Jean Sibelius (1905)

Violin Concerto No. 1 in D major, op. 19 – Sergei Prokofiev (1917)

Violin Concerto No. 2 in G minor, op. 63 – Sergei Prokofiev (1935)

Violin Concerto, op. 14 – Samuel Barber (1939)

Violin Concerto in D minor – Aram Khachaturian (1940)

Violin Concerto in D major, op. 35 – Erich Wolfgang Korngold (1945)

Violin Concerto in C major, op. 48 – Dmitry Kabalevsky (1948)

And, outstanding violin concerto movements:

Intermezzo (Poco adagio) [2nd & final movement] from Violin Concerto, op. 33 – Carl Nielsen (1911)

Sicilienne (Andantino) [2nd movement] from Concierto de estío, for violin and orchestra – Joaquín Rodrigo (1943)

Curious as to why so many violin concertos are written in the key of D major? I was.

“D major is well-suited to violin music because of the structure of the instrument, which is tuned G D A E. The open strings resonate sympathetically with the D string, producing a sound that is especially brilliant. This is also the case with all other orchestral strings.” – Wikipedia entry for D major

February is Short, the Moon Makes Haste…

Each night for the next several nights, the Moon sets much later than it did the previous night. This happens for two reasons.

First, this week the plane of the Moon’s orbit is nearly perpendicular to our horizon, so much of the Moon’s orbital motion eastward relative to the background stars (if we could see them) during the day takes it directly away from the western horizon, thus slowing as much as possible its inexorable march towards the west caused by the Earth’s rotation.

Second, this week the Moon is moving north in declination, and this, too, increases the amount of time the Moon stays above the horizon. The closer to the north celestial pole an object is, the longer it stays above our horizon, the further north along the western horizon it sets, and the later it sets. The Moon’s motion during the day northward relative to the celestial equator causes the Moon to set further north than it would have otherwise. The combination of these two factors makes moonset much later each night, as shown in the table below.

But, why doesn’t moonrise also occur much later each morning? As you can see by inspecting the table above, the Moon rises only a little later each day, in marked contrast to the leaps and bounds moonset is later each night. The factors are the same, but the effect is different. Because the Moon is moving north and is thus rising further north every morning, it rises earlier than it would have otherwise. Although the Moon is rising later each day due to its eastward orbital motion, moonrise is only a little later due to the countereffect of an earlier rise time stemming from the Moon’s more northerly declination.

It is no wonder humans have always been fascinated by the Moon’s complex motion. Throughout history, a number of mathematicians have taken up the challenge of trying to understand and predict the Moon’s motion, leading to several important advancements in mathematics.

Tucson Classical Music Performances 2022

Here’s a comprehensive list of live classical music performances in Tucson for the year 2022 where the program of composers and works has been published. I will keep this Excel document regularly updated. Please post a comment if anything should be added or changed.

I’ve included a column called “Dave’s Faves” which notes the works I am already familiar with and that I highly recommend. This is subjective, of course, but I hope this will help some of you in deciding which concerts to attend.

Happy Listening!

Tucson Classical Music Performances 2022

Click here for 2023 concerts.

Sources
Tucson Symphony Orchestra
Arizona Friends of Chamber Music
University of Arizona Fred Fox School of Music
Southern Arizona Symphony Orchestra
Civic Orchestra of Tucson
Tucson Repertory Orchestra
True Concord, Voices & Orchestra
Arizona Opera

Zodiacal Light 2022

In 2022, the best dates and times for observing the zodiacal light are listed in the calendar below. The sky must be very clear with little or no light pollution. The specific times listed are for Dodgeville, Wisconsin (42° 58′ N, 90° 08′ W).

Here’s a nicely-formatted printable PDF file of the zodiacal light calendar:

January 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
            1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19
Zodiacal Light 6:36 – 6:38 p.m. West
20
Zodiacal Light 6:37 – 7:37 p.m. West
21
Zodiacal Light 6:38 – 7:38 p.m. West
22
Zodiacal Light 6:39 – 7:39 p.m. West
23
Zodiacal Light 6:40 – 7:40 p.m. West
24
Zodiacal Light 6:41 – 7:41 p.m. West
25
Zodiacal Light 6:42 – 7:42 p.m. West
26
Zodiacal Light 6:43 – 7:43 p.m. West
27
Zodiacal Light 6:44 – 7:44 p.m. West
28
Zodiacal Light 6:46 – 7:46 p.m. West
29
Zodiacal Light 6:47 – 7:47 p.m. West
30
Zodiacal Light 6:48 – 7:48 p.m. West
31
Zodiacal Light 6:49 – 7:49 p.m. West
         

February 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
    1
Zodiacal Light 6:50 – 7:50 p.m. West
2
Zodiacal Light 7:04 – 7:51 p.m. West
3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18
Zodiacal Light 7:10 – 7:51 p.m. West
19
Zodiacal Light 7:12 – 8:12 p.m. West
20
Zodiacal Light 7:13 – 8:13 p.m. West
21
Zodiacal Light 7:14 – 8:14 p.m. West
22
Zodiacal Light 7:15 – 8:15 p.m. West
23
Zodiacal Light 7:16 – 8:16 p.m. West
24
Zodiacal Light 7:18 – 8:18 p.m. West
25
Zodiacal Light 7:19 – 8:19 p.m. West
26
Zodiacal Light 7:20 – 8:20 p.m. West
27
Zodiacal Light 7:21 – 8:21 p.m. West
28
Zodiacal Light 7:22 – 8:22 p.m. West
         

March 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
    1
Zodiacal Light 7:24 – 8:24 p.m. West
2
Zodiacal Light 7:25 – 8:25 p.m. West
3
Zodiacal Light 7:26 – 8:26 p.m. West
4
Zodiacal Light 8:14 – 8:27 p.m. West
5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
Zodiacal Light 8:47 – 8:59 p.m. West
20
Zodiacal Light 8:48 – 9:48 p.m. West
21
Zodiacal Light 8:49 – 9:49 p.m. West
22
Zodiacal Light 8:51 – 9:51 p.m. West
23
Zodiacal Light 8:52 – 9:52 p.m. West
24
Zodiacal Light 8:53 – 9:53 p.m. West
25
Zodiacal Light 8:55 – 9:55 p.m. West
26
Zodiacal Light 8:56 – 9:56 p.m. West
27
Zodiacal Light 8:57 – 9:57 p.m. West
28
Zodiacal Light 8:59 – 9:59 p.m. West
29
Zodiacal Light 9:00 – 10:00 p.m. West
30
Zodiacal Light 9:02 – 10:02 p.m. West
31
Zodiacal Light 9:03 – 10:03 p.m. West
   

April 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
          1
Zodiacal Light 9:05 – 10:05 p.m. West
2
Zodiacal Light 9:11 – 10:06 p.m. West
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30

May 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31        

June 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
      1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30    

July 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
          1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31            

August 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25
Zodiacal Light 3:33 – 4:11 a.m. East
26
Zodiacal Light 3:35 – 4:35 a.m. East
27
Zodiacal Light 3:36 – 4:36 a.m. East
28
Zodiacal Light 3:38 – 4:38 a.m. East
29
Zodiacal Light 3:39 – 4:39 a.m. East
30
Zodiacal Light 3:41 – 4:41 a.m. East
31
Zodiacal Light 3:42 – 4:42 a.m. East
     

September 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
        1
Zodiacal Light 3:44 – 4:44 a.m. East
2
Zodiacal Light 3:45 – 4:45 a.m. East
3
Zodiacal Light 3:47 – 4:47 a.m. East
4
Zodiacal Light 3:48 – 4:48 a.m. East
5
Zodiacal Light 3:49 – 4:49 a.m. East
6
Zodiacal Light 3:51 – 4:51 a.m. East
7
Zodiacal Light 3:52 – 4:52 a.m. East
8
Zodiacal Light 3:57 – 4:54 a.m. East
9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
Zodiacal Light 4:14 – 5:14 a.m. East
25
Zodiacal Light 4:16 – 5:16 a.m. East
26
Zodiacal Light 4:17 – 5:17 a.m. East
27
Zodiacal Light 4:18 – 5:18 a.m. East
28
Zodiacal Light 4:19 – 5:19 a.m. East
29
Zodiacal Light 4:21 – 5:21 a.m. East
30
Zodiacal Light 4:22 – 5:22 a.m. East
 

October 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
            1
Zodiacal Light 4:23 – 5:23 a.m. East
2
Zodiacal Light 4:24 – 5:24 a.m. East
3
Zodiacal Light 4:25 – 5:25 a.m. East
4
Zodiacal Light 4:27 – 5:27 a.m. East
5
Zodiacal Light 4:28 – 5:28 a.m. East
6
Zodiacal Light 4:29 – 5:29 a.m. East
7
Zodiacal Light 4:30 – 5:30 a.m. East
8
Zodiacal Light 5:28 – 5:31 a.m. East
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23
Zodiacal Light 4:48 – 5:12 a.m. East
24
Zodiacal Light 4:50 – 5:50 a.m. East
25
Zodiacal Light 4:51 – 5:51 a.m. East
26
Zodiacal Light 4:52 – 5:52 a.m. East
27
Zodiacal Light 4:53 – 5:53 a.m. East
28
Zodiacal Light 4:54 – 5:54 a.m. East
29
Zodiacal Light 4:55 – 5:55 a.m. East
30
Zodiacal Light 4:56 – 5:56 a.m. East
31
Zodiacal Light 4:57 – 5:57 a.m. East
         

November 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
    1
Zodiacal Light 4:59 – 5:59 a.m. East
2
Zodiacal Light 5:00 – 6:00 a.m. East
3
Zodiacal Light 5:01 – 6:01 a.m. East
4
Zodiacal Light 5:02 – 6:02 a.m. East
5
Zodiacal Light 5:03 – 6:03 a.m. East
6
Zodiacal Light 4:35 – 5:04 a.m. East
7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22
Zodiacal Light 4:21 – 5:21 a.m. East
23
Zodiacal Light 4:22 – 5:22 a.m. East
24
Zodiacal Light 4:23 – 5:23 a.m. East
25
Zodiacal Light 4:24 – 5:24 a.m. East
26
Zodiacal Light 4:25 – 5:25 a.m. East
27
Zodiacal Light 4:26 – 5:26 a.m. East
28
Zodiacal Light 4:27 – 5:27 a.m. East
29
Zodiacal Light 4:28 – 5:28 a.m. East
30
Zodiacal Light 4:29 – 5:29 a.m. East
     

December 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
        1
Zodiacal Light 4:30 – 5:30 a.m. East
2
Zodiacal Light 4:31 – 5:31 a.m. East
3
Zodiacal Light 4:32 – 5:32 a.m. East
4
Zodiacal Light 4:33 – 5:33 a.m. East
5
Zodiacal Light 4:41 – 5:34 a.m. East
6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31

The best nights to observe the zodiacal light at mid-northern latitudes occur when the ecliptic plane intersects the horizon at an angle of 60° or steeper. The dates above were chosen on that basis, with the Sun at least 18° below the horizon and the Moon below the horizon being used to calculate the times. An interval of time of one hour either before morning twilight or after evening twilight was chosen arbitrarily because it is the “best one hour” for observing the zodiacal light. The zodiacal light cone will be brightest and will reach highest above the horizon when the Sun is 18° below the horizon (astronomical twilight), but no less.

If you are interested in calculating the angle the ecliptic makes with your horizon for any date and time, you can use the following formula:

\cos I = \cos \varepsilon \sin \phi-\sin \varepsilon \cos \phi \sin \theta

where I is the angle between the ecliptic and the horizon, ε is  the obliquity of the ecliptic, φ is the latitude of the observer, and θ is the local sidereal time (the right ascension of objects on the observer's meridian at the time of observation).

Here’s a SAS program I wrote to do these calculations:

References
Meeus, J. Astronomical Algorithms. 2nd ed., Willmann-Bell, 1998, p. 99.

Scrooge

Alastair Sim in Scrooge (1951)

The iconic novella by the great English writer Charles Dickens (1812-1870), A Christmas Carol. In Prose. Being a Ghost Story of Christmas, was first published in 1843. There have been many film adaptations since, the first being in 1901. But I can’t imagine a better one than the 1951 British black & white film Scrooge. Even if you don’t celebrate Christmas, you should watch this movie.

Even after repeated viewings, I still can’t get through it without becoming teary-eyed at various points in the movie. The film score for Scrooge was written by English composer Richard Addinsell (1904-1977), and it is unquestionably a vital part of what makes this movie so good, along with the performances of all the actors—especially Alastair Sim (1900-1976) as Ebenezer Scrooge.

Experiencing this movie, you can’t help but be reminded of the following:

  • Bittersweet and very sad episodes in your own life (the older we get, the more of these we have to look back upon), especially now from a perspective of hindsight. What would you have done differently, knowing what you know now?
  • Much of what you thought was important has been a distraction from what really is important in “a life well lived”.
  • It is never too late to change the focus of your attentions and endeavors.

Timeless themes, to be sure.

Meteor Shower Calendar 2022

Here’s our meteor shower calendar for 2022.  It is sourced from the IMO’s Working List of Visual Meteor Showers (https://www.imo.net/files/meteor-shower/cal2022.pdf, Table 5, p. 25).

Each meteor shower is identified using its three-character IAU meteor shower code.  Codes are bold on the date of maximum, and one day either side of maximum.

Some additional events have been added to the calendar from Sources of Possible or Additional Activity, Table 6a, p. 27). I used the following abbreviations for the Table 6a events that do not have a standard three-character meteor code:

GY2 = 2006 GY2
209 = 209P/LINEAR
CK1 = C/1852 K1

Here’s a printable PDF file of the meteor shower calendar shown below:

Happy meteor watching!

January 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
            1
DLM QUA
2
DLM QUA
3
DLM QUA
4
DLM QUA
5
DLM QUA
6
DLM QUA
7
DLM QUA
8
DLM QUA
9
DLM QUA KCA
10
DLM QUA GUM KCA
11
DLM QUA GUM KCA
12
DLM QUA GUM
13
DLM GUM
14
DLM GUM
15
DLM GUM
16
DLM GUM
17
DLM GUM
18
DLM GUM
19
DLM GUM
20
DLM GUM
21
DLM GUM
22
DLM GUM
23
DLM
24
DLM
25
DLM
26
DLM
27
DLM
28
DLM
29
DLM
30
DLM
31
DLM ACE
         
February 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
    1
DLM ACE
2
DLM ACE
3
DLM ACE
4
DLM ACE
5
ACE
6
ACE
7
ACE
8
ACE
9
ACE
10
ACE
11
ACE
12
ACE
13
ACE
14
ACE
15
ACE
16
ACE
17
ACE
18
ACE
19
ACE
20
ACE
21 22 23 24 25
GNO
26
GNO
27
GNO
28
GNO
         
March 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
    1
GNO
2
GNO
3
GNO
4
GNO
5
GNO
6
GNO
7
GNO
8
GNO
9
GNO
10
GNO
11
GNO
12
GNO
13
GNO
14
GNO
15
GNO
16
GNO
17
GNO
18
GNO
19
GNO
20
GNO
21
GNO
22
GNO
23
GNO
24
GNO
25
GNO
26
GNO
27
GNO
28
GNO
29 30 31    
April 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
          1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14
LYR
15
PPU LYR
16
PPU LYR
17
PPU LYR
18
PPU LYR
19
ETA PPU LYR
20
ETA PPU LYR
21
ETA PPU LYR
22
ETA PPU LYR
23
ETA PPU LYR
24
ETA PPU LYR
25
ETA PPU LYR
26
ETA PPU LYR
27
ETA PPU LYR
28
ETA PPU LYR
29
ETA LYR
30
ETA LYR
May 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
1
ETA
2
ETA
3
ELY ETA
4
ELY ETA
5
ELY ETA
6
ELY ETA
7
ELY ETA
8
ELY ETA
9
ELY ETA
10
ELY ETA
11
ELY ETA
12
ELY ETA
13
ELY ETA
14
GY2 ARI ELY ETA
15
GY2 ARI ETA
16
GY2 ARI ETA
17
ARI ETA
18
ARI ETA
19
ARI ETA
20
ARI ETA
21
ARI ETA
22
ARI ETA
23
ARI ETA
24
209 ARI ETA
25
209 ARI ETA
26
209 ARI ETA
27
ARI ETA
28
ARI ETA
29
ARI
30
TAH ARI
31
TAH ARI
       
June 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
      1
TAH ARI
2
ARI
3
ARI
4
ARI
5
ARI
6
ARI
7
ARI
8
ARI
9
ARI
10
ARI
11
ARI
12
ARI
13
ARI
14
ARI
15
ARI
16
ARI
17
ARI
18
ARI
19
ARI
20
ARI
21
ARI
22
JBO ARI
23
JBO ARI
24
JBO ARI
25
JBO
26
JBO
27
JBO
28
JBO
29
JBO
30
JBO
   
July 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
          1
JBO
2
JBO
3
CAP
4
CAP JPE
5
CAP JPE
6
CAP JPE
7
CAP JPE
8
CAP JPE
9
CAP JPE
10
CAP JPE
11
CAP JPE
12
CAP SDA JPE
13
CAP SDA JPE
14
CAP SDA JPE
15
CAP SDA PAU
16
CAP SDA PAU
17
PER CAP SDA PAU
18
PER CAP SDA PAU
19
PER CAP SDA PAU
20
PER CAP SDA PAU
21
PER CAP SDA PAU
22
PER CAP SDA PAU
23
PER CAP SDA PAU
24
PER CAP SDA PAU
25
PER CAP SDA GDR PAU
26
PER CAP SDA GDR PAU
27
PER CAP SDA GDR PAU
28
PER CAP SDA GDR PAU
29
PER CAP SDA GDR
30
PER CAP SDA GDR PAU
31
PER CAP SDA GDR PAU
           
August 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
  1
PER CAP SDA PAU
2
PER CAP SDA PAU
3
KCG PER CAP SDA PAU
4
KCG PER CAP SDA PAU
5
KCG PER CAP SDA PAU
6
KCG PER CAP SDA PAU
7
KCG PER CAP SDA PAU
8
KCG PER CAP SDA PAU
9
KCG PER CAP SDA PAU
10
KCG PER CAP SDA PAU
11
KCG PER CK1 CAP SDA
12
KCG PER CK1 CAP SDA
13
KCG PER CK1 CAP SDA
14
KCG PER CAP SDA
15
KCG PER CAP SDA
16
KCG PER SDA
17
KCG PER SDA
18
KCG PER SDA
19
KCG PER SDA
20
KCG PER SDA
21
KCG PER SDA
22
KCG PER SDA
23
KCG PER SDA
24
KCG PER
25
KCG
26 27
28
AUR
29
AUR
30
AUR
31
AUR
     
September 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
        1
AUR
2
AUR
3
AUR
4
AUR
5
SPE AUR
6
SPE
7
SPE
8
SPE
9
DSX SPE
10
STA DSX SPE
11
STA DSX SPE
12
STA DSX SPE
13
STA DSX SPE
14
STA DSX SPE
15
STA DSX SPE
16
STA DSX SPE
17
STA DSX SPE
18
STA DSX SPE
19
STA DSX SPE
20
STA DSX SPE
21
STA DSX SPE
22
STA DSX
23
STA DSX
24
STA DSX
25
STA DSX
26
STA DSX
27
STA DSX
28
STA DSX
29
STA DSX
30
STA DSX
 
October 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
            1
STA DSX
2
ORI STA DSX
3
ORI STA DSX
4
ORI STA DSX
5
ORI STA OCT DSX
6
ORI STA DRA OCT DSX
7
ORI STA DRA OCT DSX
8
ORI STA DRA DSX
9
ORI STA DRA DSX
10
ORI DAU STA DRA
11
ORI DAU STA
12
ORI DAU STA
13
ORI DAU STA
14
ORI EGE DAU STA
15
ORI EGE DAU STA
16
ORI EGE DAU STA
17
ORI EGE DAU STA
18
ORI EGE DAU STA
19
LMI ORI EGE STA
20
NTA LMI ORI EGE STA
21
NTA LMI ORI EGE STA
22
NTA LMI ORI EGE STA
23
NTA LMI ORI EGE STA
24
NTA LMI ORI EGE STA
25
NTA LMI ORI EGE STA
26
NTA LMI ORI EGE STA
27
NTA LMI ORI EGE STA
28
NTA ORI STA
29
NTA ORI STA
30
NTA ORI STA
31
NTA ORI STA
         
November 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
    1
NTA ORI STA
2
NTA ORI STA
3
NTA ORI STA
4
NTA ORI STA
5
NTA ORI STA
6
LEO NTA ORI STA
7
LEO NTA ORI STA
8
LEO NTA STA
9
LEO NTA STA
10
LEO NTA STA
11
LEO NTA STA
12
LEO NTA STA
13
NOO LEO NTA STA
14
NOO LEO NTA STA
15
NOO AMO LEO NTA STA
16
NOO AMO LEO NTA STA
17
NOO AMO LEO NTA STA
18
NOO AMO LEO NTA STA
19
NOO AMO LEO NTA STA
20
NOO AMO LEO NTA STA
21
NOO AMO LEO NTA
22
NOO AMO LEO NTA
23
NOO AMO LEO NTA
24
NOO AMO LEO NTA
25
NOO AMO LEO NTA
26
NOO LEO NTA
27
NOO LEO NTA
28
PHO NOO LEO NTA
29
PHO NOO LEO NTA
30
PHO NOO LEO NTA
     
December 2022
SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT
        1
PUP PHO NOO NTA
2
PUP PHO NOO NTA
3
HYD PUP PHO NOO NTA
4
GEM HYD PUP PHO NOO NTA
5
DLM GEM HYD MON PUP PHO NOO NTA
6
DLM GEM HYD MON PUP PHO NOO NTA
7
DLM GEM HYD MON PUP PHO NTA
8
DLM GEM HYD MON PUP PHO NTA
9
DLM GEM HYD MON PUP PHO NTA
10
DLM GEM HYD MON PUP NTA
11
DLM GEM HYD MON PUP
12
DLM COM GEM HYD MON PUP
13
DLM COM GEM HYD MON PUP
14
DLM COM GEM HYD MON PUP
15
DLM COM GEM HYD MON PUP
16
DLM COM GEM HYD MON
17
DLM URS COM GEM HYD MON
18
DLM URS COM GEM HYD MON
19
DLM URS COM GEM HYD MON
20
DLM URS COM GEM HYD MON
21
DLM URS COM
22
DLM URS COM
23
DLM URS COM
24
DLM URS
25
DLM URS
26
DLM URS
27
DLM
28
DLM QUA
29
DLM QUA
30
DLM QUA
31
DLM QUA