A Real Martian Anomaly

Who cares about the Face on Mars?  It was just an interesting trick of light and shadow—a pareidolia.  Now comes a bona fide Martian mystery: pit craters (also known as skylights).  Pit craters are thought to be collapse pits into subsurface void spaces.  Cave entrances, in other worlds. ;o)

Here are a few:

https://www.nasa.gov/images/content/189803main_ody-cave2.jpg
(A) “Dena,” (B) “Chloe,” (C) “Wendy,” (D) “Annie,” (E) “Abby” (left) and “Nikki,” and (F) “Jeanne.” Arrows signify north and the direction of illumination.
Possible Skylight Near Elysium Region (141.317° E, 30.563° N)
Pit Crater near Elysium Mons (149.909° E, 23.210° N)
Very Large Pit Crater in Daedalia Planum (237.545° E, 19.474° S)
Possible Skylight Near Arsia Mons (237.837° E, 2.055° S)
Possible Cave on Arsia Mons (238.663° E, 6.355° S)
Pit Crater (239.549° E, 1.320° S)
Pit South of Arsia Mons (240.021° E, 13.851° S)
Incipient Pit Crater in the Arsia Chasmata (240.040° E, 6.518° S)
Pit Crater Chain South of Arsia Mons (240.051° E, 14.285° S)
Possible Skylight in Arsia Mons Region (240.326° E, 7.850° S)
A Pair of Small Pit Craters (240.907° E, 5.691° S)
Candidate Cavern Entrance Northeast of Arsia Mons (241.396° E, 5.532° S)
Possible Skylight on a Lava Tube Northeast of Arsia Mons (241.900° E, 2.272° S)
Dark Rimless Pits in Tharsis Region (247.549° E, 17.263° N)
A Giant Cave on a Giant Volcano (248.485° E, 3.735° N)
Pit on the Eastern Flank of Pavonis Mons (248.571° E, 0.457° S)
Pit or Cave in Tantalus Fossae (257.532° E, 35.030° N)
Collapse Pit in Tractus Fossae (259.359° E, 26.143° N)

Most of these features are of a volcanic, rather than impact, origin.  Both the Earth and the Moon have similar features, entrances to subsurface caverns and tunnels.  What wondrous discoveries await future explorers!

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